Please click here for our latest coronavirus (COVID-19) response and preparedness.

Is It Possible to Get Addiction Treatment if You Can’t Miss Work?

Almost to a man, woman and child, drug and alcohol addictions have a profound effect on their lives. Not only does the addiction affect the drug user, but it also affects the lives of people around them. At some point in time, an addiction will hit critical mass. It will send the user to what many people call “rock bottom.” At rock bottom, the user has to make one of two choices: they can continue using and put their life at risk, or they can finally make the choice to accept they have an illness and ask for help.

One of the biggest deterrents to people seeking help is them not understanding how treatment will impact their lives. Everyone has different circumstances they have to consider as part of the decision-making process regarding getting treatment. This creates a huge challenge for people who can’t see themselves being able to submit to inpatient treatment.

With that said, nothing should stand in the way of someone getting the treatment they need. For that very reason, top drug and alcohol addiction treatment centers offer a large range of addiction treatment options. From one reputable rehab enter to the next, the list of possible treatment options could include:

General outpatient treatment

Intensive outpatient treatment

Primary inpatient care – 90 days or less

Extended inpatient care – over 90 days

Partial hospitalization followed by outpatient care

Clearly, this list is comprehensive enough to offer a viable option for almost any prospective patient regardless of their circumstance. The following information is going to focus on the best options for people who simply cannot afford to miss time from work.

Treatment Options for People Who Cannot Miss Work

In order for an addiction treatment professional to be able to assign the proper course of treatment, they need an understanding of the incoming patient’s circumstances. If the incoming patient bears a lot of responsibility at work or serves as the family’s primary bread-winner, there’s a good chance inpatient treatment would be too restrictive. That’s very unfortunate for the individual who enters rehab with a significant addiction. They most likely need inpatient treatment, but it might be best to offer them another option in lieu of the addicted individual having to pass on getting treatment.

Using this as the premise for assigning treatment programs, there are three viable addiction treatment alternatives for people with work restrictions: general outpatient treatment, modified intensive outpatient treatment and partial hospitalization. Here’s an in-depth look at these options.

General Outpatient

If a patient enters rehab with a moderate addiction and a reasonable ability to maintain some level of responsibility, a general outpatient program might suffice. The patient would need to abide by a counseling schedule that might require them to meet with a counselor or group as many as 2-3 times a week for an hour or two at a time. As long as the patient stays clean and makes good progress in counseling, there’s a good chance they can find recovery on an outpatient basis.

Modified Intensive Outpatient

A normal intensive outpatient treatment program would require the patient to report to the outpatient treatment facility 5-7 days a week for at least 6 hours at a time. During this time, they would partake in hours of intensive therapy and likely participate in wellness workshops. For the individual with substantial work restrictions, this kind of program could be modified to work around the individual’s work schedule. For instance, all of the counseling sessions could be scheduled for the evenings with extra emphasis placed on weekend counseling. The responsibility for developing a workable schedule would fall on the rehab center’s staff working in conjunction with the patient.

Partial Hospitalization

If someone enters rehab with a substantial addiction to say heroin, they will likely need to compromise on the scheduling process. They will likely need some time in a hospital for detox and a good start to the therapy process. If the patient can submit to a week or two in this kind of a program, it’s likely they could finish the treatment process as an outpatient while minimizing the time they would miss from work.

If you have an addiction and need treatment, it’s your responsibility to seek treatment. At our treatment facility, we will do all we can to develop a treatment program that centers around your specific circumstances.

Ready to Make a Change?

We know that overcoming addiction is not easy and requires courage to ask for help. At Woburn Addiction Treatment, our team of professionals has decades of combined experience in helping men, women, and families overcome substance abuse.

For Confidential Help, Call: