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What are Alcohol Withdrawal Shakes and Can a Detox Center Help Them Stop?

alcohol withdrawal shakesAlcoholism is a progressive and chronic disease that can cause an array of health issues. When someone is addicted to alcohol, their body becomes accustomed to the presence of the substance in their body. This is why individuals experience withdrawal when they stop drinking alcohol suddenly.

One of the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal is becoming very shaky. This is also known as having tremors or alcohol withdrawal shakes. If someone wakes up in the morning and experiences the shakes, they are physically addicted to alcohol.

Detoxing from alcohol alone can be extremely dangerous. In severe cases, untreated alcohol withdrawal can lead to life-threatening seizures, but even in mild cases, tremors and other symptoms can be extremely uncomfortable. An alcohol detox center can prescribe medications like long-acting benzodiazepines that can alleviate alcohol withdrawal shakes, prevent seizures, and keep patients safe during detox.

What are Alcohol Withdrawal Shakes?

A common sign of alcohol withdrawal is uncontrollable shaking which mostly occurs in the hands. This shakiness is also referred to as tremors, and they usually begin 6-10 hours after an individual’s last drink. They tend to become the most pronounced 48-72 hours after the person’s last drink.[1]

When someone engages in heavy and frequent alcohol consumption, their brain chemistry changes. Alcohol causes slowed brain activity and reduced energy levels, and to overcome the sedative effect of alcohol the brain increases its nerve activity to keep the body in a heightened state of alertness. Then, when the person’s intake of alcohol suddenly stops, the brain continues to deliver increased nerve activity causing tremors, anxiety, hyperactivity, and other withdrawal symptoms.

Once a recovering alcoholic completes detox, the tremors they experienced will begin to go away. The alcohol withdrawal timeline can take a few weeks to a few months. However, without professional alcohol detox, many people end up relapsing to soothe their symptoms – making it extremely important to seek medical care.

Are Alcohol Shakes and Tremors Dangerous?

Alcohol shakes and tremors themselves are not dangerous, however, they are a sign of a dangerous condition known as alcohol withdrawal. Alcohol withdrawal can cause individuals to experience life-threatening symptoms when it is left untreated.

Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal include:[1]

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Hallucinations
  • Increased heart rate
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Restlessness
  • Sweating
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Delirium tremens (DTs)

The shakes can be a sign of a serious condition known as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS). WKS, also known as “wet brain,” is a brain and memory disorder caused by long-term alcohol abuse that requires immediate treatment. Because shakes and tremors are a symptom of this condition, individuals need to detox at a medical facility so they receive proper medical intervention and treatment.

Can a Detox Center Stop Alcohol Withdrawal Shakes?

The main goal of medical detox is to limit the symptoms of withdrawal and prevent cravings. For example, medications can be prescribed to prevent tremors and seizures. Detox centers can also identify why a person is experiencing alcohol tremors to determine whether they are suffering from an additional condition like Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

Before the withdrawal symptoms become severe, doctors and nurses will provide patients with medications to prevent the symptoms from beginning in the first place.

There are many things detox centers can do to help patients prevent alcohol withdrawal shakes. These include:[2]

  • Provide patients with benzodiazepines to manage withdrawal symptoms like tremors and reduce the risk of developing DTs
  • Give patients thiamine to lower the risk of developing Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome and tremors
  • Provide patients with beta-blockers like propranolol to reduce shakes

Coping With Shakes and Tremors

Patients can also engage in self-care activities that help to reduce withdrawal symptoms like anxiety, agitation, and alcohol withdrawal shakes.

People should choose activities that are helpful for them. One person may find that art is soothing, while another may find that exercising reduces their stress and, therefore, stops their tremors.

Other ideas for coping with shakes and tremors include:

  • Starting or continuing a hobby
  • Engaging in an exercise like walking, running, or swimming
  • Participating in yoga or meditation
  • Reading or watching happy books and TV shows
  • Listening to motivational speakers
  • Spending quality time with positive sober people
  • Trying out acupuncture to reduce stress
  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Asking a doctor about vitamins or mineral supplements that may be beneficial
  • Avoiding sugar
  • Drinking a lot of water

Coping with alcohol withdrawal shakes and tremors is all about an individual doing feel-good activities. Reducing anxiety and stress will also lead to a reduction in tremors, so self-care is extremely important to the detoxification process.

Find an Alcohol Detox Center in the Boston Area Today

Alcohol addiction can be difficult to beat, especially because of the dangerous withdrawal symptoms associated with alcohol use disorder. If you or a loved one suffer from alcoholism, it is important to get help from an alcohol detox center that can provide you with the medical treatment you need.

Woburn Wellness can help you recover from the effects of alcohol withdrawal in a safe, supportive environment before transitioning to one of our comprehensive treatment programs. Contact us today to find an alcohol detox center near you.

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6761824/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4085800/

Six Myths About Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT): Debunked

myths about medication assisted treatmentMedication-assisted treatment, commonly known as “MAT,” is the combination of FDA-approved medications, behavioral therapy, and counseling that aims to provide a whole-patient approach to addiction recovery. The medications used in MAT have been clinically tested and proven to help people struggling with addiction sustain their recovery.

Unfortunately, there is a lot of stigma and harmful myths surrounding medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Understanding where these myths come from, why they are harmful, and what the truth really is can help people gain access to the life-saving treatment they deserve.

Here are six widespread myths and facts about medication-assisted treatment.

1. MAT Means Trading One Addiction for Another Addiction

The most popular myth about medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is that this approach replaces one addiction with another. This myth is inspired by a specific type of MAT called methadone maintenance during which patients visit a clinic each day to get their methadone. Methadone is considered an opioid and does have the potential for abuse, so many people believe this myth.[1]

Fact: People taking the medications used in MAT are not getting high off their medications. They are taking a prescription given to them by a doctor and pharmacist who have the clinical understanding of when these medications are helpful. If you are concerned about getting addicted to methadone, alternative medications like buprenorphine and naltrexone have lower abuse potential.

2. If You’re on MAT, You Aren’t Really Sober

Because of the myth that MAT trades one addiction for another, some people believe that people who are using MAT aren’t really sober. This myth also stems from popular ideologies in 12-Step programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) which promote complete abstinence.

Fact: If you take your medications correctly, as prescribed by your physician, you aren’t abusing them. You also aren’t experiencing euphoric side effects like you would if you were using opioids or drinking alcohol. As a result, being in MAT while abstaining from drugs and alcohol does mean you are sober.

3. MAT is Only For People Who Are Addicted to Opioids

As of 2022, the United States is still battling an opioid epidemic that takes the lives of more than 150 Americans each day.[2] Opioid addiction is all over the news and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) has been deemed the gold standard when it comes to treating the condition. However, MAT isn’t only for people struggling with opioid use disorder.

Fact: Medication-assisted treatment is also available to people with an alcohol use disorder. FDA-approved medications like naltrexone (Revia, Vivitrol) and acamprosate (Campral) can reduce the risk of alcohol relapse.[3]

4. MAT is too Expensive

Rehab can be costly, and many people believe that adding medications into their treatment regimen will only increase their out-of-pocket costs. While finances are important to consider, MAT can be affordable. It can also help you stay sober in the long run, thereby reducing further costs of your addiction down the road.

Fact: Most insurance plans cover substance abuse treatment, including the medications prescribed during it. Speak with your insurance provider to learn more about your coverage. If you don’t have insurance, many addiction treatment centers will work out a payment plan with you that allows you to cover the cost of your medications and treatments over time.

5. You Can Only Use MAT in Early Recovery

Another popular myth about MAT is that it is only meant for short-term treatment so it is just a “quick fix.” This myth comes from the idea that medications are only used during detox.

Fact: The truth is there is no one-size-fits-all approach to addiction recovery, and everyone has their own unique treatment needs. Some people only need medications during detox. Others need medications for several months or years. In fact, most people stay on MAT for 12 months or more, and research has shown that patients who receive at least 1-2 years of MAT have the best chance of staying sober.[4]

6. MAT Doesn’t Actually Work

Because of all of the myths about medication-assisted treatment, some people don’t think this treatment approach works. Long-term studies prove otherwise.

Fact: According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), MAT has been proven to:[5]

  • Improve patient survival
  • Increase retention in treatment
  • Decrease illicit opiate use and other criminal activity among people with substance use disorders
  • Increase patients’ ability to gain and maintain employment
  • Improve birth outcomes among women who have substance use disorders and are pregnant
  • Reduce a person’s risk of contracting HIV or hepatitis C by reducing relapse potential

MAT is an evidence-based, clinically-driven treatment approach that can save lives.

Find Out if Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is Right For You

Medication-assisted treatment may not be right for everyone, and you should never take medication unless it is prescribed to you by a licensed physician. If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction and are interested in MAT, please contact us today.

Our team of dedicated admissions coordinators can evaluate your situation, verify your insurance, and help you choose the right treatment plan for you. Call now to get started.

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3413460/
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/stopoverdose/fentanyl/index.html
  3. https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2016/0315/p457.html
  4. https://nida.nih.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2019/04/methadone-maintenance-treatment-during-incarceration-has-long-term-benefits
  5. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment

Most Dangerous Substances to Detox From and How a Medical Detox Center Can Keep You Safe

most dangerous drugs to detox fromWhen you become addicted to a substance, your body and mind become dependent on that drug. If you attempt to cut back on or completely quit using the drug, your system will go haywire because the substance isn’t present in your system anymore. This is known as drug withdrawal, which can cause some pretty serious symptoms.

Depending on the type of drug you were addicted to, some of the symptoms of withdrawal can be extremely dangerous without medical intervention. This is why medical detox programs are so important. These medical detox centers can help you overcome the symptoms of withdrawal in a comfortable and safe manner, no matter which type of drug you were abusing.

Let’s take a look at the most dangerous drugs to detox from and how a medical detox center can help keep you safe.

What are the Most Dangerous Drugs to Detox From?

Some drugs are more dangerous to detox from than others. The most dangerous withdrawal symptoms are associated with the following drugs.

Alcohol

While alcohol abuse is normalized in our country, alcoholism is one of the most difficult substance use disorders to overcome. Alcohol consumption causes central nervous system depression, meaning it slows down the functioning in that part of your brain. During withdrawal, the central nervous system attempts to readjust to the lack of alcohol in your system.

This causes extreme withdrawal symptoms that can become life-threatening without the help of a medical detox program. Some of these symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Anxiety
  • Tremors
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Mood swings
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • Heart palpitations
  • Increased blood pressure or heart rate
  • Hyperthermia
  • Rapid breathing
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures
  • Delirium tremens (DTs)

Up to 5% of people who detox from alcohol experience DTs, a potentially life-threatening condition made up of the most severe withdrawal symptoms.[1]

Benzodiazepines

When it comes to benzodiazepine withdrawal, this is the second most dangerous substance to detox from on your own. While a medical detox program can help you safely overcome the symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal, attempting to quit cold turkey could cost you your life.

The symptoms of benzodiazepine withdrawal include:[2]

  • Nausea
  • Panic attacks
  • Tremors
  • Anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Headaches
  • Heart palpitations
  • Muscle pain
  • Seizures

A slow benzodiazepine taper that is monitored by a medical professional can reduce the severity of benzo withdrawal.

Heroin

Heroin is a strong opioid drug that most users intravenously inject, causing an intense and euphoric high. This drug is also a depressant, meaning it slows down your central nervous system. Oftentimes, the abuse of this drug leads to respiratory depression and overdose, making it extremely lethal.

When you abuse heroin, you become addicted to the drug very quickly. This can lead to extreme withdrawal symptoms if you attempt to stop using the drug abruptly.

The symptoms of heroin withdrawal include:

  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Sweating
  • Shaking
  • Nervousness
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Muscle spasms
  • Cravings for heroin

While heroin withdrawal is generally not life-threatening, there is a high chance of relapse. Medical supervision can prevent relapse and keep you comfortable by prescribing medications like methadone or buprenorphine.[3]

Crack Cocaine

Crack cocaine is a stimulant drug that is created from the powdered substance known as cocaine. Crack cocaine is less expensive than cocaine, however, it creates a more intense high. This causes users to become addicted to the drug extremely fast.

And, as you now know, when someone becomes addicted to a drug they will experience symptoms of withdrawal upon missing a dosage or quitting the substance.

The dangerous withdrawal symptoms associated with crack addiction include:

  • Anxiety
  • Exhaustion
  • Unpleasant dreams
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Irritability
  • Depression that could lead to suicidal thoughts
  • Agitation or shaking
  • Cravings
  • Insomnia
  • Lack of motivation
  • Inability to feel pleasure (anhedonia)
  • Anger or mood swings

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine is a highly potent stimulant drug that you can become addicted to after only one or two uses. While most drugs cause dangerous physical symptoms of withdrawal, methamphetamine causes extremely concerning psychological symptoms. This can cause you to experience symptoms of psychosis, which include hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and a disconnection from reality.

The symptoms of methamphetamine withdrawal include:[4]

  • Fatigue
  • Increased appetite
  • Agitation
  • Insomnia
  • Hypersomnia (sleeping too much)
  • Excessive sweating
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Psychosis
  • Fever
  • Red, itchy eyes
  • Confusion
  • Nausea
  • Loss of motivation
  • Tremor
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Stomach upset
  • Anxiety
  • Severe depression
  • Dehydration

How Does a Medical Detox Center Help You Stay Safe?

When you enter a medical detox program, they will do a full assessment of your drug abuse, medical, mental health, and family history. This provides them with a full picture of what services you need, what your goals are, and what detox medications you would benefit from.

Once the assessment is over, you will begin your detox program. Depending on which type of drug you are withdrawing from, you will be provided with FDA-approved medications to soothe your symptoms of withdrawal and prevent cravings from occurring. This helps to prevent you from experiencing the life-threatening effects of withdrawal like seizures, severe depression, or psychosis.

During your entire stay at a medical detox program, nurses will routinely check your vital signs. Your vital signs include your body temperature, pulse rate, respiration rate, and blood pressure. If any of these vital signs are out of the norm, you will be provided with medications and treatments to stabilize your condition, keeping you safe during the whole process.

Get Connected With a Top-Rated Medical Detox Center in Massachusetts

At Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment, we offer inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, and dual diagnosis programs. Before you enter one of our treatment programs, you can detox safely at a reputable medical detox center near you.

But how do you find one?

We can help connect you with a drug and alcohol detox facility that is equipped to provide you with the treatment you need. Then, after you complete your detox, you can transfer from detox to IOP to receive the behavioral therapy and peer support you need to recover from addiction. Contact us today for more information on how to get started.

References:

  1. https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-1/61-66.pdf
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7841856/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526012/
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3071736/

Oxycodone Withdrawal Timeline and How a Medical Detox Center Can Help

oxycodone withdrawal timelineAccording to the U.S. Department of Justice, more than 13 million Americans abuse oxycodone every year.[1]

Oxycodone is an opioid medication used to treat severe pain. This medication belongs to a class of drugs known as narcotic analgesics (pain medicines). It is intended for short-term use as it is highly habit-forming and addictive.

When an individual becomes addicted to oxycodone, they will develop a physical dependency. This means that if they attempt to cut down or stop using the drug completely they will experience symptoms of withdrawal. The symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal can become extremely distressing, causing individuals to relapse to soothe their symptoms.

Oxycodone Withdrawal

Oxycodone Withdrawal Timeline and Symptoms: What to Expect

The withdrawal symptoms associated with oxycodone addiction can be difficult to deal with, especially if an individual is attempting to detox at home. More often than not, detoxing without a medical program leads to relapses and overdoses, as the individual attempts to take the same dosage of oxycodone as they did before stopping the medication. However, medical detox centers in Massachusetts can help patients cope with the effects of withdrawal.

The symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal include:

  • Irritability and agitation
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Anxiety
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive sweating
  • Body aches
  • Runny nose
  • Headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart arrhythmias

Withdrawal symptoms usually begin to appear 8 to 12 hours after the individual’s last dosage. The symptoms peak, becoming the most severe at around 72 hours of detox. While these symptoms usually subside within a week, the cravings for oxycodone and psychological symptoms of withdrawal can persist for weeks or even months.

The oxycodone withdrawal timeline heavily depends on the type of medication an individual was taking. Immediate-release oxycodone has a half-life of 3 to 4 hours, while extended-release has a half-life of 12 hours.[2] How the drug was administered (swallowing, smoking, snorting, or injecting) plays a role in the timeline of withdrawal as well.

How Can a Medical Detox Center Help with Oxycodone Withdrawal?

Oxycodone withdrawal can be painful and extremely uncomfortable, but medications can be administered to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. Opioid detox centers in Massachusetts help patients through the detox process using a combination of medications and supportive care.

Detox Medications

The most common medications used to treat the symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal include methadone and buprenorphine. These opioid dependence treatment medications work to soothe the symptoms of withdrawal and reduce opioid cravings.

Methadone is a long-acting full opioid agonist, meaning it activates the brain’s opioid receptors to make the individual feel as if they have taken oxycodone. This helps them overcome withdrawal symptoms and taper off of the opioid substance safely and effectively.

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. This means it activates the opioid receptors just enough to alleviate symptoms, however, it does not produce psychoactive effects similar to oxycodone and other opioids. This prevents individuals from experiencing the effects they were addicted to while experiencing the same benefits as methadone treatment.

24-Hour Supervision and Support

During a detox program, each patient has access to 24-hour supervision and support. Dealing with detox can be extremely difficult, especially when considering that the individual’s coping mechanism was taken away. Detox programs have licensed mental health professionals ready to help patients throughout the oxycodone withdrawal timeline.

Holistic Therapies

Opioid detox centers also use holistic therapies to help manage the symptoms of oxycodone withdrawal and reverse any damage that the substances caused the individual. For example, nutritional therapy helps patients replace the vitamins and minerals that became depleted during opioid addiction.

According to a study, “Malnutrition is a major consequence due to substances not only replacing nutrients but interfering with the metabolism of nutrients. In chronic opioid abuse, B vitamin folate deficiency occurs and has a disastrous eوٴect on the digestive system.”[3]

Additionally, yoga and meditation are used to help individuals soothe symptoms of pain and psychological symptoms like anxiety or depression. These practices help individuals be present in the moment, increase levels of calmness, and let go of past traumas associated with addiction.

Group Counseling

Lastly, group counseling sessions are used in detox facilities to help individuals gain insight into their issues and receive support from their peers. Being able to interact with individuals who are going through similar issues as themselves allows patients to feel less alone.

This improves the psychological symptoms of withdrawal and prepares patients for inpatient or outpatient addiction treatment, which heavily relies on the use of individual and group therapy for addiction recovery.

Get Connected with a Massachusetts Opioid Detox Center Today

Oxycodone addiction – or any opioid use disorder for that matter – is not an easy thing to go through. Because of this, if you or a loved one suffers from an addiction to opioids you should seek professional help.

Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment Center can provide you with the medical detox services you need and allow you to transition into residential treatment immediately after. This provides you or your loved one with all of the tools you need to recover, all within one location. Contact us today to get connected with a Massachusetts opioid detox center.

References:

  1. https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdny/pr/manhattan-us-attorney-announces-conviction-local-doctor-unlawfully-dispensing-more-12
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17525040/
  3. https://hosting.uaa.alaska.edu/afpmc/Cunningham_JAddictionResearch_Therapy.pdf

Can a Medication-Assisted Treatment Program Help Me Stop Relapsing?

medication-assisted treatment for relapse preventionThe primary goal of addiction treatment is to overcome addiction and learn the skills you need to achieve long-term sobriety. Unfortunately, addiction is a disease that is of chronic nature. That means some people relapse, or make a return to drug or alcohol use after an attempt to stop. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, between 40 and 60% of people who seek substance abuse treatment relapse at some point in their recovery journey.[1]

Effective treatment looks for ways to minimize relapse risk among patients. The best way to do this is by providing a highly individualized approach that helps you identify and treat the root causes of your addiction. However, focusing on personal recovery and inner healing isn’t easy when you’re distracted by symptoms of withdrawal or incessant drug cravings.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is an evidence-based approach to addiction treatment that can help you prevent relapse and stay engaged in your recovery program.

Medication-Assisted Treatment

What is Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)?

Medication-assisted treatment, commonly referred to as “MAT,” is an integrated approach to addiction treatment that combines behavioral therapy, counseling, and FDA-approved medications. This comprehensive approach to recovery is thought to provide “whole-patient” healing to patients struggling with opioid or alcohol dependency.[2]

A medication-assisted treatment program typically consists of:

  • Medically-supervised detox
  • Inpatient and/or outpatient rehab
  • Group and individual therapies
  • Medication management
  • Long-term aftercare

Medications used to treat opioid use disorder include:[3]

  • Buprenorphine
  • Methadone
  • Naltrexone

These medications are used during detox to alleviate symptoms of opioid withdrawal. They are also used during treatment and aftercare to help individuals cope with opioid drug cravings. By reducing withdrawal symptoms and cravings, medication-assisted treatment can help you prevent relapse.

Medications used to treat alcohol use disorder include:[3]

  • Naltrexone
  • Acamprosate
  • Campral
  • Disulfiram

These medications are used after detox is complete to help restore normal brain chemistry and reduce the severity of alcohol cravings. In doing so, these medications can help minimize relapse risk.

Understanding the Benefits of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT)

By treating symptoms of withdrawal as well as cravings, MAT offers many benefits to eligible patients. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the benefits of MAT include:[2]

  • Improve patient survival
  • Increase retention in treatment
  • Decrease illicit opiate use and other criminal activity among people with substance use disorders
  • Increase patients’ ability to gain and maintain employment
  • Improve birth outcomes among women who have substance use disorders and are pregnant
  • Reduce the risk of contracting HIV or hepatitis C by reducing the potential for relapse

How Can Medication-Assisted Treatment Help Prevent Relapse?

The primary reason why MAT is so popular is that it improves treatment outcomes and prevents relapse. In fact, MAT can help you avoid relapse during all three stages of your recovery.

During Detox

The top cause of relapse during detox is the intolerable withdrawal symptoms that occur when you first stop using drugs and alcohol. A combination of flu-like physical symptoms and agonizing psychological symptoms can make you crave drugs or alcohol so badly that you give in to your cravings and get high. But, when you are taking MAT medications that reduce the severity of withdrawal symptoms and alleviate cravings, you have a major advantage.

Medications like buprenorphine or methadone can help you avoid the worst of your withdrawal symptoms so that you are more likely to stay in detox and stick to your recovery program.

In Treatment

Even after the physical symptoms of withdrawal wear off, you may still struggle with psychological symptoms of restlessness, anxiety, depression, insomnia, and cravings. These symptoms can make it difficult to stay motivated and focused in your recovery. However, the medications used in MAT are clinically proven to increase treatment retention. This is because medications can reduce the intensity and frequency of drug cravings while also helping to stabilize your brain chemistry so you feel better faster.

After Rehab

By the time you finish rehab, you will be equipped with a variety of coping skills and local resources that can help you prevent relapse, but that doesn’t mean cravings won’t occur every now and again. Continuing to take MAT medications in a medication management program can help keep your cravings at bay so you can focus on what’s most important–staying sober. Not only that, but regular visits with your doctor to discuss your treatment will help hold you accountable.

Prevent Relapse With Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) in Massachusetts

Although relapse is sometimes considered a normal part of recovery, it can be very dangerous and even deadly in some circumstances. By reducing the risk for relapse and improving treatment outcomes, medication-assisted treatment (MAT) can offer you a way out of addiction that works the first time.

If you or someone close to you has been suffering at the hands of addiction of any type or severity. Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment is available to help. Our comprehensive program of clinical care is unlike any other in the area – we consistently provide the highest quality of care available in a highly personalized and integrated treatment setting.

Don’t wait any longer to get the life-changing help you deserve. Call now to speak with a team member about getting started.

References:

  1. https://nida.nih.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/treatment-recovery
  2. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment
  3. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/medications-counseling-related-conditions

Heroin Withdrawal Timeline, Symptoms, and How a Detox Center Can Help

heroin withdrawal timelineAn addiction to heroin can ruin people’s lives. Over the course of their addiction, they can lose their friends, families, their jobs, their homes, and for too many, it may even cost them their life. The decision to quit heroin for good is an admirable, and worthy undertaking. Admittedly though, it’s not for the faint of heart. Heroin withdrawal symptoms are unpleasant, and it can feel impossible to weather them on your own, especially with no end in sight.

Whether you have already decided to quit or if you’re still considering if you truly want to quit using heroin, it’s important to know that the freedom and health that comes along with sobriety can eclipse the pain of withdrawal. There is the promise of relief on the other side of the detoxification process, once all symptoms have subsided. Simply knowing the heroin withdrawal timeline, what symptoms to expect, and where to go to get help while you detox can help you conquer your heroin addiction once and for all.

Heroin

What is the Heroin Withdrawal Timeline?

If you are already feeling the symptoms of heroin withdrawal, your first question is probably: when will this be over?

Heroin is a highly addictive drug that can cause physical and emotional dependency within only a few uses. But, the length of withdrawal symptoms will vary greatly from person to person based on their individual usage.

For instance, if you have been using heroin for a number of years or if your body is adapted to higher dosages, you are more likely to experience a longer detox process than someone who’s only just started using. Additionally, women tend to experience symptoms longer than men do.

Generally speaking, the withdrawal process will begin within 6-12 hours of the last dose.

Gradually, symptoms will begin to increase in severity until they peak in intensity between one and three days. This period will be the hardest to endure, but the good news is that if you can make it through the peak the more serious symptoms will begin to gradually subside between days four and ten.

After the tenth day, symptoms should begin to disappear entirely. If symptoms persist after fourteen days, it is vital that you contact your doctor. You may be experiencing PAWS (Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome) or you may have other complications.

Heroin Withdrawal: Symptoms and Timeline
Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms and Timeline Infographic

What Are The Symptoms of Heroin Withdrawal?

When you are detoxing from heroin, you may experience all or some combination of the below symptoms:[1]

  • Sweats
  • Chills
  • Stomach cramps
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Muscle aches
  • Muscle spasms
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting
  • Fatigue
  • Increased blood pressure and rapid heartbeat

In addition to the physical symptoms of withdrawal, you may experience any number of emotional symptoms such as:

  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Intense cravings
  • Restlessness
  • Insomnia

While the heroin withdrawal timeline is challenging to endure, it’s important to note that the process of detoxing from heroin is rarely fatal. However, it is not unheard of. If symptoms are particularly intense, it’s important to seek medical treatment. Even if your symptoms are moderate, they could be more manageable when undertaken with the help of a seasoned and dedicated staff at a detox center.

How Can a Detox Center Help Ease the Symptoms of Heroin Withdrawal?

Detoxing at home is possible, but heroin withdrawal is unpredictable, and it can be frightening to try and do it on your own. Seeking treatment at a Massachusetts heroin detox center can provide you with a clean, comfortable, peaceful space where you have access to 24/7 medical care.

Every detox center’s approach to heroin detox is different. Many employ medication-assisted treatment, commonly referred to as “MAT,” to help ease symptoms. With MAT, medical professionals at your detox center will prescribe an appropriate opioid replacement. Common medications include methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine. These medications essentially work to help wean people off of heroin. They reduce the severity and the duration of symptoms.[2]

Once your detox is complete, a comprehensive heroin treatment program will be recommended for continued care.

Building a plan for recovery is vital in moving forward to achieve long-term sobriety so that you only ever have to experience the pain of withdrawal once. A detox center’s rehabilitation and therapy programs can help you to build the long-term coping skills you need to maintain your sobriety well into the future.

Overcoming the Heroin Withdrawal Timeline With Help From a Massachusetts Detox Center

If you are considering quitting heroin and taking the first steps on your road to recovery, don’t deny yourself the care and support you deserve! At Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment in Woburn, MA, we offer an evidence-based, holistic approach to recovery that prioritizes individual success. That’s why our opioid rehab program has a completion rate 150% higher than the national average.

Our uniquely tailored treatment programs will cater to your needs. Our team can help you manage the symptoms of your heroin withdrawal, provide you with the emotional support you’ll need in the immediate days following your detox, and help you to build a comprehensive plan for continued care so that you can maintain your sobriety and safeguard your wellness for years to come.

Call today to talk to our admissions counselors.

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526012/
  2. https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/medications-counseling-related-conditions

What is Opioid Detox Like in Massachusetts?

opioid detox in MassachusettsOpioids are a class of drugs that include natural, synthetic, and semi-synthetic prescription painkillers and illicit drugs, including heroin, fentanyl, morphine, codeine, oxycodone, and more. All opioid drugs have a significant risk for abuse and addiction, and they are physically and psychologically habit-forming.

If you or someone you love is addicted to opioids, you know just how difficult it is to stop using them once you are hooked. People who suffer from opioid addiction typically require a rigorous treatment program that consists of medical detox, medication-assisted therapy, and comprehensive substance abuse therapy. The first step in recovering from opioid addiction is detox.

Asking for help with addiction can be scary, but actually going to detox and facing drug withdrawal can be even scarier. Knowing what opioid detox is like can help prepare you mentally and ease some of your fears. Here is what you can expect during opioid detox in Massachusetts.

Symptoms of Opioid Withdrawal

Opioid drugs bind to opioid receptors in the brain to change the way the brain and nerve cells respond to pain. However, they also produce excess endorphins that are physically and mentally addictive. After using opioids for an extended period of time, your body becomes dependent on these excess endorphins, and it goes into withdrawal without them.

During detox, your body begins to flush substances from your system. If you have developed a physical dependence on opioids, your brain and body will take time to adjust to not having opioids in the system. This adjustment period is marked by flu-like symptoms of withdrawal.

Symptoms of opioid withdrawal include:[1]

  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Sweating
  • Yawning
  • Agitation
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Goosebumps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Drug cravings

Although these symptoms can be uncomfortable, they are usually not life-threatening. Symptoms typically begin in the first 12 hours after your last dose of opioids and can last for up to a week. The longer you have been abusing opioids, the more severe you can expect your withdrawal symptoms to become.

The Importance of Medical Detox for Opioid Withdrawal

Even though opioid withdrawal does not produce life-threatening symptoms, complications and risks are involved. The most pertinent risk is the risk for relapse. Opioid withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable, and the psychological cravings that occur can be intense. Many opioid users know that the easiest and fastest way to relieve these symptoms is to use opioids again. Without proper support, many individuals fail to complete the detox process in the first place.[2]

Opioid detox centers in Massachusetts provide around-the-clock support and medical care to keep you safe and comfortable. They can prescribe medications that alleviate your withdrawal symptoms and make it easier to deal with cravings. By detoxing at a medical facility, you minimize the risk for relapse and other medical complications while giving yourself an honest shot at a sober life.

What to Expect During Opioid Detox in Massachusetts

Opioid detox programs can be broken down into three phases: intake, medication management, and treatment planning.

Intake and Assessment

When you first arrive at an opioid detox program in Massachusetts, you will meet with various members of the clinical team to complete the intake and assessment process. During intake, your personal items may be searched, you sign paperwork to consent to medical care, and provide information regarding your medical history.

Assessment is much more thorough than intake. This is when you have a complete physical and psychological exam to help the clinical team determine your treatment needs. You may be asked questions about your physical health, mental health, drug and alcohol use, family medical history, prescription medications, and more.

Intake and assessment should only take a couple of hours, in total.

Medically-Assisted Detox

After completing intake, you will be shown to your room and given the opportunity to settle in. Your doctor may prescribe you an opioid treatment medication like methadone or buprenorphine to help relieve your withdrawal symptoms and make you more comfortable. Throughout your stay in detox, nurses will regularly check your vitals and monitor you to prevent any medical complications. You may also have access to group therapy, recovery-focused meetings, and other activities to help pass the time and keep your cravings at bay.[3]

You will stay in medically-assisted detox (or the medication management phase) until your symptoms subside and you are cleared for discharge. Most people stay in opioid detox for 3-7 days.

Treatment Planning and Preparation

Before you are discharged from the program, you will meet with a substance abuse counselor for treatment planning and preparation. Opioid addiction cannot be cured with detox alone which is why addiction specialists recommend at least 90 days of treatment.[4] A counselor will help you determine what kind of treatment program you need, which facility is in-network with your insurance, and all other details. They will even make arrangements for you to arrive at the treatment facility.

Find an Opioid Detox Program in Massachusetts Today

After completing detox, our opioid rehab program in Woburn, Massachusetts can help you establish a foundation for life-long sobriety. If you or a loved one are struggling with opioid addiction, don’t wait any longer. Pick up the phone and speak with one of our dedicated admissions coordinators today.

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526012/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2851054/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3202507/
  4. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/principles-effective-treatment

Can I Stop Taking Xanax Cold Turkey?

stop taking Xanax cold turkeyXanax (alprazolam) is a brand-name prescription drug that is used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. It is a benzodiazepine that is effective when used properly but physically and psychologically habit-forming when used in the long term. Xanax is indicated for short-term use that does not exceed 2-4 weeks. Taking Xanax in a higher dose than prescribed or for longer than one month can cause physical dependence and addiction.

If you have become addicted to Xanax and are exploring your options in regards to quitting the drug, you have two options:

  1. Stop taking Xanax suddenly and go through “cold turkey withdrawal” or
  2. Work with your doctor or a medical provider to come up with a tapering schedule that gradually lowers your dose, preventing severe and life-threatening withdrawal symptoms

Unfortunately, benzodiazepine tapers last for several weeks and sometimes even months. While a taper can reduce the risk of severe withdrawal symptoms, you may be tempted to “pull the bandaid off” and get detox over with. But is it really safe to stop taking Xanax cold turkey?

What Does it Mean to Quit “Cold Turkey”?

The phrase “quitting cold turkey” is used to describe the abrupt cessation of a substance that someone is addicted to. Instead of slowly tapering off of an addictive substance, this method involves stopping all at once and going through unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. The term is also usually used in reference to people quitting using substances without any kind of medical supervision.

The phrase dates back to the early 1920s to describe individuals going through detox. The origin of the phrase comes from some of the most common symptoms of drug and alcohol withdrawal: cold chills and goosebumps. People who are detoxing often feel cold, clammy, and go through periods of time where they have goosebumps on their arms or legs–similar to a turkey that has been in the refrigerator.[1]

Some substances, such as marijuana, are perfectly safe to quit using cold turkey. Others, such as Xanax, are more dangerous to stop using all at once.

Dangers of Quitting Xanax Cold Turkey

Xanax is addictive because it increases the reuptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, a neurotransmitter responsible for the central nervous system (CNS) and reactions to anxiety, fear, and stress. Psychiatric illnesses such as anxiety, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia are associated with low levels of GABA which is why Xanax is an effective treatment.[2] However, during withdrawal, the brain goes into overdrive as it tries to compensate for the sudden reduction in GABA activity. This is what causes symptoms of withdrawal.

The slower the pace of reduction of GABA in the brain, the less severe withdrawal will be. Stopping Xanax cold turkey causes an immediate loss of GABA activity, and therefore, causes severe symptoms of Xanax withdrawal.

Symptoms of Xanax Withdrawal

Cold turkey Xanax withdrawal may cause painful and even life-threatening side effects. Symptoms of withdrawal include:[3]

  • Insomnia
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Irritability
  • Muscle pain
  • Headaches
  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Trembling
  • Lack of concentration
  • Nausea
  • Heart palpitations

While these symptoms are generally not life-threatening, the chances of experiencing potentially fatal withdrawal symptoms increase substantially when you do not taper off of the drug. Serious side effects of Xanax withdrawal are:

  • Convulsions
  • Seizures
  • Psychosis
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Relapse

If you begin experiencing any of these symptoms while detoxing from Xanax, it’s crucial that you seek immediate medical attention.

How to Safely Stop Taking Xanax

The safest and most comfortable way to stop taking Xanax is to slowly taper your dose under medical supervision. Anyone who has been taking Xanax for longer than 30 days, especially those with co-occurring disorders, the elderly, or those who struggle with polydrug use.[4] How long your taper will last depends on several factors, such as:

  • How long you’ve been using Xanax
  • What dose you take on a regular basis
  • Your age, weight, and metabolism
  • Co-occurring mental or physical health conditions

The first dose reduction usually ranges between 5% and 25% of the dose you have been taking. Then, every 1-4 weeks you will be evaluated by your doctor who will continue reducing your dose accordingly by between 5% and 25%. Overall, most Xanax tapers last between 8 and 12 weeks.[4]

Other medications, like gabapentin (an anticonvulsant) or antidepressants may be prescribed to help treat rebound symptoms of anxiety, panic, or seizures.

You should never attempt to taper yourself off of Xanax or stop taking it cold turkey. Instead, you should consult with your doctor or a medical detox center about stopping the medication.

Find Treatment for Xanax Addiction Today

If you are thinking about stopping Xanax cold turkey, we sincerely hope you reconsider. Here at Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment, our team can connect you with medical detox services and outpatient substance abuse treatment so you can stop taking Xanax safely and learn how to stay sober. Contact us today to learn more about how our benzodiazepine treatment programs can help.

References:

  1. https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/why-do-we-quit-cold-turkey
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526124/
  3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7841856/
  4. https://www.aafp.org/afp/2017/1101/p606.html

4 Ways a Massachusetts Detox Center Can Help You With Fentanyl Withdrawal

medical detox for fentanyl withdrawalFentanyl is a powerful, semi-synthetic opioid drug that is 50-100 times more potent than heroin and morphine. It is also highly addictive. Unfortunately, fentanyl is a primary driver of opioid overdose deaths across the nation and is responsible for nearly 57,000 drug overdose deaths in 2020 alone.[1]

If you are using or addicted to fentanyl, it’s important to recognize just how dangerous fentanyl actually is. Without professional help, your tolerance will only continue to increase, and your risk for experiencing an overdose will, too. The best way to stay safe and protect yourself is to ask for help for your addiction.

The first step towards overcoming fentanyl addiction is detox. During detox, your body rids itself of fentanyl and other substances so you can become clear-headed and adjust to living without the substance. Fentanyl withdrawal, however, isn’t easy. It is characterized by intense flu-like withdrawal symptoms and incessant drug cravings that make staying sober extremely difficult.

The easiest, safest, and most effective way to deal with fentanyl withdrawal is to do so with the help of a medical detox center. Here are four ways a Massachusetts drug and alcohol detox center can help you cope with fentanyl withdrawal.

1. Detox Medications Can Reduce the Severity of Your Fentanyl Withdrawal Symptoms

The FDA has approved several medications to treat opioid withdrawal and dependence. The most widely used is buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist-antagonist that binds to and activates opioid receptors without producing a high or releasing endorphins. This helps reduce the severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms and alleviates drug cravings.[2]

Buprenorphine is a controlled substance that can only be prescribed by licensed physicians. It is also highly regulated and isn’t always sent home with patients on an outpatient basis. Instead, if you want to get your hands on buprenorphine to cope with fentanyl withdrawal, you’ll need to enlist the help of a medical detox facility.

During detox, doctors can prescribe and nurses can administer treatment medications that make withdrawal far more bearable. They can also prescribe additional medications like clonidine for high blood pressure or a muscle relaxer for restless leg syndrome. Whatever your medical needs may be, our Massachusetts detox center has you covered.

2. 24/7 Support and Monitoring Prevents Possible Complications During Fentanyl Withdrawal

The symptoms of fentanyl withdrawal are rarely life-threatening, but they can be severe. You may experience symptoms such as fever, chills, muscle and bone pain, diarrhea, and more.[3] However, if you struggle with underlying health conditions or were also addicted to other substances in addition to fentanyl, you may be at risk for possible complications like dehydration, seizures, and hallucinations. Without treatment, these complications can be potentially fatal.

When you go through withdrawal at a Massachusetts detox center, doctors, nurses, and behavioral health technicians (BHTs) are on-site 24/7. Nurses will check your vitals on a regular basis, your doctor will check on you each day, and BHTs can connect you with any other services you may need. This constant monitoring and supervision can prevent complications during withdrawal, keeping you safe and healthy until you are cleared for discharge.

3. Detoxing at a Drug and Alcohol Detox Center Separates You From Drugs, Alcohol, and Triggers

Many people think they want to detox at home so they can have their phone, sleep in their own bed, follow their own schedule, and remain close to family and friends. While this may sound ideal, it is actually really hard to do. Detoxing alone puts you at extremely high risk for relapse. Even if you think you can cope with the physical symptoms of fentanyl withdrawal, you may be no match for the mental symptoms and drug cravings that are inevitably going to come.

Changing environments can help take your mind off fentanyl. It can also separate you from your phone so you can’t call your drug dealer and your bank so you can’t pull out cash to buy drugs. Additionally, drug and alcohol detox centers in Massachusetts are “safe spaces” that are free from drugs, alcohol, and triggers. Even though detox centers won’t hold you there against your will, this separation can still work in your favor.

4. Counseling and Support Groups Can Help You Cope With Fentanyl Cravings

Massachusetts detox centers offer more than just medical care and supervision. They also offer counseling sessions and support groups.

Fentanyl withdrawal is going to go by very slowly if all you do is lay in bed and wait to feel better. Instead, your mental health can benefit from participating in group counseling sessions or peer support groups. These resources allow you to express the way you are feeling, connect with other like-minded individuals, and begin learning healthy coping skills to deal with cravings.

Trust us–the last thing you want to do when overcoming fentanyl addiction is to try and endure the withdrawal symptoms and cravings on your own.

Find Help From a Massachusetts Drug and Alcohol Detox Center Today

The easiest and safest way to treat fentanyl withdrawal is to ask for help from a medical detox center. Our team can place you with a local detox facility for acute care, then help you transition to one of our outpatient recovery programs. Here at Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment in Massachusetts, our opioid treatment program offers individualized care for fentanyl, a prescription painkiller, and heroin addictions. Contact us today to learn more.

References:

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459126/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526012/

The Dangers of Getting Sober Without Rehab

getting sober without rehabAddiction is a chronic and progressive condition that requires professional treatment. Nationwide surveys show that nearly 10% of U.S. adults struggle with substance use disorder at some point in their lives but up to 75% report not receiving any form of treatment.[1] Those who don’t go to rehab often face multiple failed attempts at trying to get sober by themselves. Others spend years desperately searching for a quick fix or a cure-all for their addiction. Those who are not as fortunate end up facing a multitude of devastating consequences, ranging from legal troubles to medical issues and preventable death.

If you are tired of living in a cycle of addiction, you may be tempted to try to get sober without going to rehab. Although there are many how-to guides for at-home detox and more, there are significant dangers associated with getting sober on your own. The safest, most effective route towards sobriety is by attending a drug and alcohol rehab near you. Addiction treatment facilities provide individualized care for drugs, alcohol, trauma, mental health, and more, so you can stay safe, sober, and recover successfully.

Here are some of the biggest dangers of getting sober without drug and alcohol rehab.

The Dangers of At-Home Drug and Alcohol Detox

The first obstacle you have to overcome once you decide to get sober is withdrawal. Drug and alcohol withdrawal occurs when you stop taking a substance that your body has become addicted to. Almost all substances cause withdrawal, and some withdrawal syndromes are more dangerous than others.

Two of the most dangerous types of substances to detox from are alcohol and benzodiazepines. Both substances can cause life-threatening symptoms like irregular heartbeat, hallucinations, and seizures.[2] Medical detox programs can prescribe medications that prevent seizures and reduce other severe withdrawal symptoms. This can help prevent severe complications. If you attempt to detox at home and have a medical emergency, you could end up in the emergency room.

Even when drug withdrawal symptoms are not potentially deadly, they can be extremely intense and uncomfortable. For example, opioid withdrawal can feel like a severe case of the flu accompanied by intense drug cravings and insomnia.[3] Symptoms such as these can make it difficult to get through the detox process without picking up a drink or a drug. That is why so many people fail to complete detox on their own.

The Effects of Getting Sober Without Rehab on Your Mental Health

The physical effects of drug and alcohol withdrawal are painful and dangerous, but they only last for 1-2 weeks. The psychological effects of getting sober, however, can last for several months or even years after you stop using substances.

After detox, you may find that you are still struggling with feelings of anxiety, depression, shame, low-self esteem, regret, and more. Further, multiple surveys have found that nearly 50% of people who struggle with substance use disorder also experience mental illness and vice versa.[4] Whether you have a diagnosable mental illness or not, it is completely normal for your mental health to suffer when you first get sober. After all, it takes time for your mind and body to adjust to living without drugs and alcohol.

A huge part of substance abuse treatment is to learn how to cope with difficult feelings. If you struggle with mental health, behavioral therapy can provide you with the tools and knowledge you need to manage your symptoms. Addiction treatment centers also have mental health professionals on staff who can provide comprehensive evaluations and medications, if needed.

You won’t have access to any of these services if you are getting sober without rehab. Ignoring your mental health can result in relapse.

The Problem With Trying to Maintain Long-Term Sobriety Without Rehab

One of the primary focuses of rehab is to learn how to live sober and prevent relapse. Drug rehab centers accomplish this through a multidisciplinary approach involving:

  • Individualized care that targets your specific needs
  • Behavioral therapy to identify and modify self-destructive behaviors and thought patterns
  • Group therapy sessions that allow you to connect with others and build a sober support network
  • Relapse prevention planning that considers your lifestyle, schedule, and beliefs
  • Aftercare planning that consists of outpatient programs, sober living homes, and alumni events
  • 12-Step facilitation to encourage you to participate in a support group after rehab

Without these services, you may not be prepared to stay sober in the long term. This can be problematic because the risk of overdose increases after periods of sobriety. You see, the body develops tolerance to substances that are abused on a regular basis. When a person stops using a drug, such as heroin or Xanax, their tolerance drops. Some people do not realize this and when they relapse, they use the same dose they used to take when they had a tolerance. Reduced or lost tolerance can cause you to overdose.[5]

Get The Help You Need Today

Getting sober without help from a drug and alcohol rehab center can be dangerous. People who try to do so are often unsuccessful. Instead of struggling on your own, reach out to an addiction specialist at Woburn Wellness Addiction Treatment. We’ll help you find a flexible treatment option that meets your needs. Call now.

References:

  1. https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/10-percent-us-adults-have-drug-use-disorder-some-point-their-lives
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4606320/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526012/
  4. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/common-comorbidities-substance-use-disorders/part-1-connection-between-substance-use-disorders-mental-illness
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC153851/